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Allergies & Special Diets

Special Dietary Needs

If you have allergies or adhere to a special diet, such as low-fat, organic, vegetarian or vegan, you will find a supportive menu and staff committed to helping you achieve your dietary goals. MIT Dining and MIT Medical also work together to provide personal attention and find service solutions for students with special dietary requirements wherever possible.

Kosher - Shabbat and Jewish Holiday Meals


Kosher Dining at MIT adheres to the highest standards of Jewish dietary law. Program oversight is by the Vaad Harabonim of New England [Rabbinical Council of New England], MIT Campus Dining, and MIT Hillel. The Howard Dining Hall in Maseeh Hall offers a dedicated kosher station during lunch and dinner. Visit the House Dining Homepage, operated by Bon Appétit, to for menus and hours.  Also, Kosher Dining offers some weekday dinners in W11 at 6 p.m. Visit the MIT Hillel kosher dining web page for a schedule. Please contact MIT Hillel for more information.

Halal Food

Muslim students will find halal menu offerings at The Howard Dining Hall in Maseeh Hall, Baker House, and McCormick Hall. Visit the House Dining Homepage for more information including menus and hours of operation. Sepal, located in the Lobdell Food Court, also serves halal menu items.

Vegetarians


If you observe a vegetarian diet, you will find choices at every restaurant on campus. All House Dining locations offer extensive vegetarian menus. Wherever possible, dedicated equipment is used to prepare and maintain the integrity of vegetarian offerings. Vegan students may enjoy dining at the Clover Food Truck.

Allergies

There are 7 food items that account for almost 90% of food allergic reactions: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat. We work hard to identify all dishes that are prepared with these items and we advise diners with allergies to do following:

  1. Pay attention to dish names. Dishes made with common allergens often have that allergen mentioned in the name of the dish.
  2. Read labels. Many of our grab-and-go items are packaged with nutrition labeling, and many hot entrées have nutrition labels posted at the point of service.
  3. Dine in house dining halls and establish a relationship with the chef. Simple conversations with the chef in your house can make your dining experience a lot easier. Identify your allergies to the chef manager or MIT Dining as early in the term as possible.

Students with special diets should be seen by a student health professional at MIT Medical Primary Care and receive a referral to the MIT Medical nutritionist.  All visits are free and confidential!